WEEKLY REFLECTIONS:

Chinese wisdom

“When I let go of what I am, I become what I might be.” – attributed to Lao Tsu, aka Lao Zi, legendary Chinese Taoist philosopher, supposed to have lived between 600-400BC

‚ÄúThere is no greater happiness than freedom from worry, and there is no greater wealth than contentment.” – attributed to Lao Tsu, aka Lao Zi, legendary Chinese Taoist philosopher, supposed to have lived between 600-400BC

“People’s tendency towards good is as water’s tendency is to flow downhill.” – Mencius, Chinese philosopher, c.300BC

“Eat less, taste more.” – traditional Chinese proverb

“Failure lies not in falling down. Failure lies in not getting up.” – traditional Chinese proverb

“The higher my rank, the more humbly I behave. The greater my power, the less I exercise it. The richer my wealth, the more I give away. Thus I avoid, respectively, envy and spite and misery.” – Sun Shu Ao, Chinese minister from the Chu Kingdom, Zhou Dynasty, c.600BC

“Do not worry if others do not understand you. Instead worry if you do not understand others.” – Confucius, Chinese philosopher, 551-479 BC

“Softness overcomes hardness.” – Zuo Qiuming, court writer of the State of Lu, and contemporary of Confucius, c.500BC

“The greatest capability of superior people is that of helping other people to be virtuous.” – Mencius, Chinese philosopher, c.300BC

“A great man is hard on himself; a small man is hard on others.” – Confucius, Chinese philosopher, 551-479 BC

“Failure is the mother of success.” – traditional Chinese proverb

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